Mozilla and Learning: thinking bigger

January 15, 2015 § 3 Comments

The web belongs to all of us — or, at least, it should. Sadly, this is less and less the case. Both the reality — and the possibilities — of the web increasingly belong to a small handful of companies. These companies are becoming the empires of the web.

mozillalearning

The Mozilla community is one of the few groups on the planet dedicated to shifting this tide. One way we do this is by building tools that put people in control of their data, their identity and their corner of the web. This is our mission. Also: it is Mozilla’s mission to empower people learn how to powerfully wield the web as a part of their lives.

Why understanding the web matters

Recent research for a new Webmaker app has reminded why the learning side of this equation is so important. As part of this research, we’ve been running focus groups with new smartphone users in Bangladesh and Kenya. This picture is from Kenya.

Screen Shot 2015-01-15 at 7.46.38 AM

During these focus groups we usually ask people: “Do you use the Internet on your phone?”

The response is often: “What’s the Internet?”

“Then what do you use you phone for?” we then ask.

The most common response: “Oh, I just use Facebook and WhatsApp!”

We hear this over and over. I do not want the next three billion people to think that the Internet is Facebook and nothing more. I want them to be able to imagine — and wield — everything the Internet can do. I want them to see themselves as citizens of the web.

This is why I want Mozilla to become just as recognized and respected in learning as it is in software. This starts with the work we’re doing with Webmaker, of course. And it builds on our fellowships and leadership programs. But I think we need to think even bigger and broader: we need to imagine Mozilla as a global classroom and lab for the citizens of the web.

Good news: we’ve made a great deal of progress

We first started work on learning back at the first Mozilla Festival in Barcelona in 2010, which focused on ‘learning, freedom and the web’. And we’ve made huge progress since.

The biggest success we’ve had in learning so far has been our local mentor networks. These networks go by a number of names. Hive. Webmaker. Maker Party. The formula is pretty much the same in all cases:  Mozilla volunteers and supporters meeting up locally to teach young people — and each other — to wield the full power of the web.

Screen Shot 2015-01-15 at 7.46.57 AM

If you look at Maker Party alone — a campaign just two months long — you can see that we’ve built something powerful: 2500 learning events run by 5000 volunteers in in 450 cities around the world. This is something I am proud of. And it’s something I want us to do more of.

As we move into 2015, that’s exactly what we will do: we will invest in making these networks stronger. In particular, we will focus on getting people to teach year round, not just during our campaigns. We’ll be launching Webmaker Clubs and growing Hive teacher networks in more cities around the world. These local networks represent an incredibly important ground game for Mozilla. They are something we want to nurture and build on.

The second place we have made progress in is in creating tools for learning how to make and shape the web.

The initial tools we created in the years following Barcelona were focused on learning the basics of creating web pages and online videos. Xray Goggles. Thimble. Popcorn. These tools have been great for face to face learning through things like Maker Parties and Hives. However, we realized along the way, that they aren’t mass market and don’t serve learners directly. We had people banging on the door saying: How can I learn with Mozilla? How can I do something with Mozilla if I can’t go to a Maker Party?

Last year, we put together a team to ask: what would we make if we wanted to really engage learners directly? We also put together a team of researchers to ask: what would it look like if the only computer you had was a phone? What kind of web page or app could you create?

Flowing from from these questions, we started putting together a very different version of our Webmaker tools focused on meeting the mass market of learners where they are. These tools will come together over the course of 2015, starting with a low bar for people to begin making and learning with Mozilla. Over the course of the year, we will add a smartphone version, social connections between learners and ways for people to mentor and help each other learn. We will also be looking for ways to integrate these new tools directly into Firefox, Firefox for Android and FirefoxOS channels.

The third place we have made progress is in building leaders: people who will in some way play a role in shaping where the web goes and turning the tide back towards a web that is ours.

Our most significant work on this front has been through a number of community labs. Open News. Mozilla Science Lab. Mozilla Advocacy. All of these programs initially started out with either fellowships or training programs. The idea was that we could bring people who deeply understand and care about the open web to news, science and policy, with the ultimate hope that getting the right people in place would bake the values of the web into these important aspects of society.

While fellowships and training remain an important part of this work, these programs have evolved into virtual watering holes for people a) who are leaders in their field and b) who are figuring out ways to tap into the power of the web in their work. All sorts of tools and ways of organizing have emerged. Shared code repositories. Joint software projects. Conferences and meetups. Hackathons. In many ways, these programs have become like distributed research institutes or grassroots grad schools where the best people in a field learn by solving problems together.

We need more. In 2015, we’ll grow the number of fellows — from 7 last year to 15 this year. Much more importantly, we’re going to look for ways to more systematically tap into this community lab model as a part of Mozilla’s community-driven learning offerings and our participation efforts as a whole.

Thinking bigger: Mozilla as a global classroom and lab

I am proud of what we have accomplished and optimistic about where we are headed next. However, I also believe we need to think much bigger.

This year, I want us to do exactly this: let’s put a stake in the ground that says Mozilla is a global classroom and lab for the citizens of the web. I want us to say more loudly: building people’s understanding of the web — and building the leaders of the future of the web — is core to our work. We need to put a stake in the ground and commit to being the best in the world at this.

Given what we’re already doing, being bold doesn’t need to involve huge new investments. In fact, it can start simply with being more clear and assertive the work we already do. Not just with Webmaker, Hive and Maker Party, but also with user education in Firefox, Mozilla Developer Network, ReMo program and our research and fellowships programs. What I’m talking about starts with making these things stronger — and then telling a clear story to ourselves and the world about how they add up to a coherent whole. That’s what I want us to start doing in 2015.

As a first step towards this, a number of us have drafted an initial three year plan for Mozilla’s learning initiatives. This includes, but goes beyond, Webmaker. The plan opens with this text:

Within 10 years there will be five billion citizens of the web. Mozilla wants all of these people to know what the web can do. What’s possible. We want them to have the agency, tools and know-how they need to unlock the full power of the web. We want them to use the web to make their lives better. We want them to know they are citizens of the web

Building on Webmaker, Hive and our fellowship programs, Mozilla Learning is a portfolio of products and programs that help these citizens of the web learn the most important skills of our age: the ability to read, write and participate in the digital world. These programs also help people become mentors and leaders: people committed to teaching others and to shaping the future of the web.

Over the course of the year, I will work with people across — and beyond — Mozilla to flesh out this plan, focusing especially on how we build a sustainable approach to running learning programs that are at once global, distributed and that positions Mozilla as *the* best place to turn if you want to learn about the web.

If you’re interested in being involved — or have comments on the initial plan — I’d love to hear from you, either here or by email. And, if you have thoughts on any aspect of this topic, I strongly encourage you to write about it on your own blog and pingback to this post.

My priorities

January 12, 2015 § Leave a comment

I usually write down a list of personal priorities at the start of each year. I’ve done the same this year, but with a twist. I haven’t just listed things that me and my org need to do, I also wrote some notes on where I want to focus more energy. With the aim of being transparent on how I plan to spend my time, I’ve posted all this below.

Focus

Optimism
Creativity
Impact

Big for 2015 (Mark)

Mozilla University concept is clear, we have logic model that explains
Money is starting to emerge around this model, fundraising tells our story
Board is stronger, we have new members and growing bench strength
New approaches to participation in play pan-Mozilla, it’s working
MoFo feels more sustainable and humane, on all levels

Big for 2015 (MoFo)

We know the communities we’ve built much better, they are part of us
Local learning community model that works, fits MoFo logic model
Software that people like / use / get value from
Research / lab / fellows model that is clear
Clear leaders and metrics for each product and program

More

Optimism and kindness
People feeling included and empowered
People on staff spending time with our volunteers
Transparency and internal comms flow in all directions
Genuine traction and impact — depth

Less

Noise and churn
Meetings
Restructuring
Navel gazing
Booze

Things to write soon

Transparency habits
2015 priorities
Mozilla Learning starter post
Radical participation notes
Mozilla learning planning / engagement arc
Webmaker clubs, why and what

The other reason I write this sort of stuff down is to get feedback. I’m going to ask the people on my management team if there are big things missing from this list. However, I’m open to hearing input: if you’re someone at Mozilla or in my general orbit who things there are big topics missing from this list of how I plan to spend 2015, I’d be interested to hear from you. Either here as a comment or privately by email.

What is radical participation?

January 9, 2015 § 27 Comments

Last year, we started talking about radical participation and Mozilla — the idea that we need to get more creative and aggressive with our approach to getting people involved if we want to win the current battles we’re fighting on the web.

Radical Participation Doodle

The response has generally been positive. People like the poetry. But a number of people have also asked, what specifically do you mean by ‘radical participation’? Fair question.

Personally, I don’t have a firm definition yet. But I do have thoughts. I’ve jotted them down below with the hope of getting other people to do the same. If people share their thoughts, I’ll try to synthesize what I hear into some sort of working definition or discussion paper over the next few weeks.

Mark’s notes on radical participation at Mozilla:

As a starting point, why do we care about radical participation? Because we want to have an impact on the world. We want to shape the web for the better. For this to happen, we believe that we need an approach participation that is at once massive and diverse, local and global. Without these things, we neither have the diversity nor the number of people we need to confront the huge challenges that Mozilla and the web face today.

The kind of radical participation we need includes:

  1. Many more people than today are working on Mozilla activities around the world in their own small groups.
  2. Some of these people participate by helping to build, improve or promote our products and programs. Our products and programs get better all the time because people are participating. This is traditional open source participation, but not just limited to software and updated with current methods and approaches.
  3. Others are coming up with new ideas for products, programs, whatever — things that move the mission forward in ways that others in Mozilla see as valuable. This is more of an ‘open innovation meets distributed leadership’ definition of participation. IMHO, this is something we want to do but haven’t done well in the past.
  4. Still others are connected to Mozilla because we have designed participation into what we’ve built — there is deep integration of participation into the *use* and *value proposition* of our key products and programs. E.g. people are helping to create an open maps databases as they use Firefox OS or people are teaching others about the web by offering casual advice to other users inside of Mozilla products like Firefox. This is about designing participation into the experiences that Mozilla offers people. We’ve never really done this before.
  5. The result: all these people are having impact that we can see. Our products get better. Our programs succeed. New (and good) ideas for how to move the mission emerge and get acted upon.
  6. All this is decentralized, but it aligns well with our brand, priorities and mission. We find good ways to balance creativity and emergence with coherence and crispness of message.
  7. We have clear programs and infrastructure to support all this: people know how to *act* and get things moving under the Mozilla banner.
  8. Ultimately, there are more Mozilla activities taking place around the world than employees can keep track of, let alone control.

For this to happen, we need an architecture of participation that includes:

  • A clear (and updated) framework for starting something — a project, a local group, etc.
  • Plans and working methods that are as transparent as possible — people see what we’re doing and where we’re going, and can join in. We used to be good at this, but we’re not right now.
  • High quality on boarding and eduction: a way to for people to understand our philosophy, goals and ground rules; and a way for people to quickly get started in doing something useful.
  • A way to recognize — and possibly to rank — people’s participation and contributions. This can both motivate people and help them find a path to what they should do next.
  • A clear *volunteer* leadership structure, where people anywhere can get involved in leading and shaping the direction of Mozilla once they have proven themselves. Education and recognition are key drivers of this.
  • Software that is embedded into the workflow of products and programs that makes participation in that work easier (e.g. SuMo does this well). This lets people who want to do standard stuff have impact fast.
  • Software that lets groups and project organize, communicate and work under the Mozilla banner. This lets people with new ideas or new local communities get going easily.
  • Explicit ways to talk about and evaluate whether a specific group or project is succeeding. On the one hand, a way for teams to brag. On another, a way for teams and the overall org to know when things aren’t going well.
  • Data and metrics that let us optimize, improve and troubleshoot the overall system.

Ultimately, we need better versions of the participation models we have today and we also need completely new approaches that we invent or borrow from others. Taking radical participation at Mozilla will require us to make these kinds of improvements quickly and in ways that show real impact.

As I said above, this are just notes. I don’t think this is the final or complete way to talk about radical participation at Mozilla — we need language that is crisp enough to inspire and specific enough to act on. And, I suspect there is lots missing and much to disagree with. But, hopefully, these notes are enough to spark others to think about how we build more participation and more impact into Mozilla.

My question, especially if you are a Mozillian: what does high impact radical participation look like to you?

If you have ideas on this, please add comments at the end of this post. Or, do your own post and send me a link. I’ll review whatever I see in the next two weeks and then come back with a post that synthesizes what I hear.

PS. A concrete plan of action on community and participation — including increased focus on ReMo and our regional communities — is in the works. Mitchell, myself and others will be posting about this next week.

Transparency habits

January 8, 2015 § 2 Comments

I have always tried to be as transparent as possible in work that I do at Mozilla. Why? I truly believe that thinking and working in the open gets better results. It gets more people engaged. It gives you access to more ideas and perspectives. And, ultimately, it leads to better thinking and better work. Working in the open is core to both who I am — and who Mozilla is.

Over the past year, I feel like I’ve become less good at this. I’m spending more time in Google Docs and video conferences. I’m spending less time blogging, working on wikis and participating in public calls and forums. On some level, this is just a change in what tools I use. But, on another, it’s a switch in my habits. The result is I have less of a transparency habit overall — and it’s harder for people to see what I am (and we are) working on.

As 2015 gets rolling, I want to change this. I want to get back in the groove with my transparency habits. I’m challenging myself to:

  1. Blog more, especially about our plans and progress.
  2. Tweet about what I’m working on so people who are interested can see what I’m focused on in any given week.
  3. Put key documents I’m working on on a central wiki for the project in question so that people can always find them and track them.
  4. Start reading Planet Mozilla and Planet Webmaker again so that I have a better sense of what others are doing.
  5. Do more work on public calls and public forums, and less on closed video calls.

These sound like small things — and in many ways they are. But these little habits can make a real difference in terms of getting people engaged and involved in what we’re doing. As we think about a more radical approach to participation at Mozilla, that’s important. And worth working on.

I encourage everyone at Mozilla to ask themselves: how can we all build up our transparency habits in 2015? If you already have good habits, how can you help others? If, like me, you’re a bit rusty, what small things can you do to make your work more open?

PS. Huge thanks to Humph for his Video Killed the Radio Star post late last year, which is one of the things that inspired me to work on better habits in 2015.

David, Goliath and empires of the web

December 18, 2014 § 3 Comments

People in Mozilla have been talking a lot about radical participation recently. As Mitchell said at recently, participation will be key to our success as we move into ’the third era of Mozilla’ — the era where we find ways to be successful beyond the desktop browser.

davidandgoliath

This whole conversation has prompted me to reflect on how I think about radical participation today. And about what drew me to Mozilla in the first place more than five years ago.

For me, a big part of that draw was an image in my mind of Mozilla as the David who had knocked over Microsoft’s Goliath. Mozilla was the successful underdog in a fight I really cared about. Against all odds, Mozilla shook the foundation of a huge empire and changed what was possible with the web. This was magnetic. I wanted to be a part of that.

I started to think about this more the other day: what does it really mean for Mozilla to be David? And how do we win against future Goliaths?

Malcom Gladwell wrote a book last year that provides an interesting angle on this. He said: we often take the wrong lesson from David and Goliath story, thinking that it’s surprising that such a small challenger could fell such a large opponent.

Gladwell argues that Goliath was much more vulnerable that we think. He was large. But he was also slow, lumbering and had bad eyesight. Moreover, he used the most traditional fighting techniques of his time: the armour and brute force of infantry.

David, on the other hand, actually had a significant set of strategic advantages. He was nimble and good with a sling. A sling used properly, by the way, is a real weapon: it can project a rock at the speed of a .45 caliber pistol. Instead of confronting Goliath with brute force, he used a different and surprising technique to knock over his opponent. He wasn’t just courageous and lucky, he was smart.

Most other warriors would have seen Goliath as invincible. Not David: he was playing the game by his own rules.

In many ways, the same thing happened when we took on Microsoft and Internet Explorer. They didn’t expect the citizens of the web to rally against them: to build — and then choose by the millions — an unknown browser. Microsoft didn’t expect the citizens of the web to sling a rock at their weak spot, right between their eyes.

IMG_20141202_144835~3

As a community, radical participation was our sling and our rock. It was our strategic advantage and our element of surprise. And it is what shook the web loose from Microsoft’s imperial grip on the web.

Of course, participation still is our sling. It is still part of who were are as an organization and a global community. And, as the chart above shows, it is still what makes us different.

But, as we know, the setting has changed dramatically since Mozilla first released Firefox. It’s not just — or even primarily — the browser that shapes the web today. It’s not just the three companies in this chart that are vying for territorial claim. With the internet growing at breakneck speed, there are many Goliaths on many fronts. And these Goliaths are expanding their scope around the world. They are building empires.

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 4.46.59 AM

This has me thinking a lot about empire recently: about how the places that were once the subjects of the great European empires are by and large the same places we call “emerging markets”. These are the places where billions of people will be coming online for the first time in coming years. They are also the places where the new economic empires of the digital age are most aggressively consolidating their power.

Consider this: In North America, Android has about 68% of smartphone market share. In most parts of Asia and Africa, Android market share is in the 90% range – give or take a few points by country. That means Google has a near monopoly not only on the operating system on these markets, but also on the distribution of apps and how they are paid for. Android is becoming the Windows 98 of emerging economies, the monopoly and the control point; the arbiter of what is possible.

Also consider that Facebook and WhatsApp together control 80% of the messaging market globally, and are owned by one company. More scary: as we do market research with new smartphone users in countries like Bangladesh and Kenya. We usually ask people: do you use the internet: do you use the internet on you phone? The response is often: “what’s the Internet?” “What do you use you phone for?”, we ask. The response: “Oh, Facebook and WhatsApp.” Facebook’s internet is the only internet these people know of or can imagine.

It’s not the Facebooks and Googles of the world that concern me, per se. I use their products and in many cases, I love them. And I also believe they have done good in the world.

What concerns me is that, like the European powers in the 18th and 19th centuries, these companies are becoming empires that control both what is possible and what is imaginable. They are becoming monopolies that exert immense control over what people can do and experience on the web. And over what the web – and human society as a whole – may become.

One thing is clear to me: I don’t want this sort of future for the web. I want a future where anything is possible. I want a future where anything is imaginable. The web can be about these kinds of unlimited possibilities. That’s the web that I want everyone to be able to experience, including the billions of people coming online for the first time.

This is the future we want as a Mozilla. And, as a community we are going to need to take on some of these Goliaths. We are going to need reach down into our pocket and pull out that rock. And we are going to need to get some practice with our sling.

The truth is: Mozilla has become a bit rusty with it. Yes, participation is still a key part of who we are. But, if we’re honest, we haven’t relied on it as much of late.

If we want to shake the foundations of today’s digital empires, we need to regain that practice and proficiency. And find new and surprising ways to use that power. We need to aim at new weak spots in the giant.

We may not know what those new and surprising tactics are yet. But there is an increasing consensus that we need them. Chris Beard has talked recently about thinking differently about participation and product, building participation into the actual features and experience of our software. And we have been talking for the last couple of years about the importance of web literacy — and the power of community and participation to get people teaching each other how to wield the web. These are are the kinds of directions we need to take, and the strategies we need to figure out.

It’s not only about strategy, of course. Standing up to Goliaths and using participation to win are also about how we show up in the world. The attitude each of us embodies every day.

Think about this. Think about the image of David. The image of the underdog. Think about the idea of independence. And, then think of the task at hand: for all of us to bring more people into the Mozilla community and activate them.

If we as individuals and as an organization show up again as a challenger — like David — we will naturally draw people into what we’re doing. It’s a part of who we are as Mozillians, and its magnetic when we get it right

We are all citizens of the web

November 10, 2014 § 1 Comment

Ten years ago today, we declared independence. We declared that we have the independence: to choose the tools we use to browse and build the web; to create, talk, play, trade in the way we want and where we want; and to invent new tools, new ways to create and share, new ways of living online, even in the face of monopolies and governments who insist the internet should work their way, not ours. When we launched Firefox on on November 9, 2004, we declared independence as citizens of the web.

Firefox NYT Ad

The launch of Firefox was not just the release of a browser: it was the beginning of a global campaign for choice and independence on the web. Over 10 million people had already joined this campaign by the time of the launch — and 10s of millions more would join in coming months. They would join by installing Firefox on their own computers. And then move on to help their friends, their families and their coworkers do the same. People joined us because Firefox was a better browser, without question. But many also wanted to make a statement with their actions: a single company should not control the web.

By taking this action, we — the millions of us who spread the software and ideas behind Firefox — helped change the world. Remember back to 2004: Microsoft had become an empire and a monopoly that controlled everything from the operating system to the web browser; the technology behind the web was getting stale; we were assaulted by pop up ads and virus threats constantly. The web was in bad shape. And, people had no choices. No way to make things better. Together, we fixed that. We used independence and choice to bring the web back to life.

And alive the web is. For all 2.8 billion of us on the web today, it has become an integral part of the way we live, learn and love. And, for those who think about the technology, we’ve seen the web remain open and distributed — a place where anyone can play — while at the same time becoming a first class platform for almost any kind of application. Millions of businesses and trillions of dollars in new wealth have grown on the web as a result. If we hadn’t stood up for independence and choice back in 2004, one wonders how much of the web we love today we would have?

And, while the web has made our lives better for the most part, it both faces and offers new threats. We now see the growth of new empires — a handful of companies who control how we search, how we message each other, where we store our data. We see a tiny oligopoly in smartphones and app stores that put a choke hold on who can distribute apps and content — a far cry from the open distribution model of the web. We see increased surveillance of our lives both by advertisers and governments. And, even as billions more people come online, we see a shift back towards products that treat people as consumers of the digital world rather than as makers and as citizens. We are at risk of losing our hard won independence.

This is why — on the 10th birthday of Firefox — I feel confident in saying that Mozilla is needed more than ever. We need great products that give people choices. We need places for those of us who care about independence to gather. And we need to guard the open nature of the web for the long haul. This is why Mozilla exists.

Who owns the internet?

Just as we did 10 years ago, we can start to shift the tide of the web by each and every one of us taking concrete actions — big or small. Download the Firefox 10th Anniversary release — and then tell a friend why Mozilla and Firefox still matter. Grab a colleague or a parent or a kid and teach them something about how the web gives them independence and choice. Or, just watch and share the Firefox 10 video with friends (it’s really good, honest :)). These are a few small but meaningful things you can do today to celebrate Firefox turning 10.

Putting the web back on course as a force for openness and freedom will require much more than just small actions, of course. But it’s important to remember that the global community of people who installed Firefox for others — and then talked about why — made a huge difference when Mozilla first stood up for the web. We moved mountains over the past 10 years through  millions of people taking small actions that eventually added up to a groundswell. As we look today for new ways to shore up our independence on the web, we will need to do this again.

Th 10th Anniversary of Firefox is a day to celebrate, no doubt. But today is also a day to deepen our commitment to choice and independence — to stand together and start sharing that commitment with everyone around us.It is a day to show that we are citizens of the web. I hope you will join me.

You did it! (maker party)

September 21, 2014 § 1 Comment

This past week marked the end of Maker Party 2014. The results are well beyond what we expected and what we did last year — 2,513 learning events in 86 countries. If you we’re one of the 5,000+ teachers, librarians, parents, Hivers, localizers, designers, engineers and marketing ninjas who contributed to Webmaker over the past few months, I want to say: Thank you! You did it! You really did it!

makerparty_postparty_infographic_static_vertical_v2-600x892

What did you do? You taught over 125,000 people how to make things on the web — which is the point of the program and an important end in itself. At the same time, you worked tirelessly to build out and expand Webmaker in meaningful ways. Some examples:

  • Mozilla India organized over 250 learning events in the past two months, showing the kind of scale and impact you can get with well organized corps of volunteers.
  • Countries including Iran, New Zealand, and Sweden held their first ever Maker Party, adding to the idea that Webmaker is a truly global effort.
  • Tools and curriculum focused on mobile were added into the Webmaker suite — AppMaker was launched in June and was well received in Maker Parties around the world.
  • Over 300 partners orgs including major library and after school networks participated, bringing even more skilled teachers and mentors into our community.
  • New and innovative ways to teach the web in a very low touch manner rolled out, including a Firefox snippet that let you hack our home page x-ray goggles style.
  • Webmaker teamed up with Mozilla’s policy team, with a sub-campaign for Net Neutrality teach-ins plus a related reddit AMA.

It’s important to say: these things add up to something. Something big. They add up to a better Webmaker — more curriculum, better tools, a larger network of contributors. These things are assets that we can build on as we move forward. And you made them.

You did one other thing this summer that I really want to call out — you demonstrated what the Mozilla community can be when it is at its best. So many of you took leadership and organized the people around you to do all the things I just listed above. I saw that online and as I traveled to meet with local communities this summer. And, as you did this, so many of you also reached out an mentored others new to this work.You did exactly what Mozilla needs to do more of: you demonstrated the kind of commitment, discipline and thoughtfulness that is needed to both grow and have impact at the same time. As I wrote in July, I believe we need simultaneously drive hard on both depth and scale if we want Webmaker to work. You showed that this was possible.

Celebrating at MozFest East Africa

Celebrating at MozFest East Africa

So, if you were one of the 5000+ people who contributed to Webmaker during Maker Party: pat yourself on the back. You did something great! Also, consider: what do you want to do next? Webmaker doesn’t stop at the end of Maker Party. We’re planning a fall campaign with key partners and networks. We’re also moving quickly to expand our program for mentors and leaders, including thinking through ideas like Webmaker Clubs. These are all things that we need your help with as we build on the great work of the past few months.

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